About Legends

    “In the past 100 years there are few historical moments that have not been recorded by photographers, but strangely enough, most of the photographers themselves have remained invisible.” - Peter Adams.

    “That thought germinated a simple idea that has become a huge and complex undertaking. The length of the list was daunting, the geographic spread global. Adams conducted detailed research through many publications, including a monumental encyclopedia of photographers, to establish a list of possible individuals. The length of the list was daunting, the geographic spread global.
   In the early 1980s, Adams photographed a few Australians, including the father of modern Australian photography, Max Dupain. Later, when he was making plans to include Laurence Le Guay in Sydney and Brian Brake in Auckland, they both died quite unexpectedly. This was a serious disappointment which alerted Adams to the fact that major coverage should be commenced without delay.
     In 1985, the first overseas trip on the project was made to the west coast of the United States. This was a fertile visit for, on return to Sydney, he had completed 40 portraits together with taped interviews.
At this point, Adams knew there would be no turning back.
Travel to 14 countries followed over the years.”
– David Moore

“Good photography isn’t about Zone Printing or any other Ansel Adams nonsense. It’s just about seeing. You either see or you don’t see. The rest is academic. Photography is simply a function of noticing things. Nothing more.”
ELLIOTT ERWITT, NEW YORK, 1992.
Elliott Erwitt

“It should be the aim of every photographer to make a single exposure that shows everything about the subject.
I have been told that my portrait of Churchill is an example of this.”
YOUSUF KARSH, OTTAWA, 1992.

Yousuf Karsh
 “I stumbled across Steichen’s ‘Family Of Man’ exhibition, and since then I’ve always wanted to take photos of people less fortunate than me so that, in a small way, I can have an effect.”
GRAHAM McCARTER, BALMAIN, 1984.
Graham McCarter
“The more I see of other people’s photographs, the more I realise the truly great photographs one remembers, are those that have been shot ‘straight’ without the use of any technical tricks.”
DAVID MOORE, McMAHONS POINT, SYDNEY, 1983.